Fruit Crop Propagation Method - Marcotting | UNIVERSITY AGRICULTURE PARK
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Fruit Crop Propagation Method - Marcotting

Introduction 

Marcotting is a very popular propagating method. Fruit seedlings can be propagated quickly and to be moved to other areas or for sale.

In general, marcotting is a method of propagation in which a branch or twig will be attached with rooting media to it before a new seedlings is produced.

Among the fruit crops that are suitable for this method are lemon, longan and bellfruit.

 

Advantages

  • Maintains original fruit crops characteristics
  • Easy
  • Does not require high skills
  • High success percentage

 

Disadvantages

  • No taproots, can cause matured trees to fall if not pruning regularly

 

Equipment and Materials

 
Grafting knife & Scateur
 
Transparent plastic & straps
     
 
Rooting hormone (if neccessary) e.g.: seradix
 
Rooting media e.g.: jiffy-7 / cocopeat / compacted loose soil


Methods

 
Choose a branch or twig which is semi-old, mature leaves and not flowering/bearing fruit
 
Remove small leaves/twigs at the place where the marcotting will be made, usually 60-90cm from the shoot using a scateur
 
Make the first cut under the node around the branch/twig using a grafting knife
 
Make a second cut about 2-3cm below the first cut around the branch/twig
 
Make a vertical cut between the first and second cuts
 
Peel the bark of branch/twigs to expose the stem (brightly colored)
 
Scrape the cambium layer until it is dry
 
Apply rooting hormone under the node (first cut earlier)
 
Tie the plastic wrap under the second cut
 
Stick the rooting media between the first and second cut to covers the exposed stem
 
Lift the plastic wrap over the first cut and tie neatly
 
Depending on the type of fruit crop, after 21-30 days, new roots will appear
 
Branches/twigs can be cut below the rooting media, unwrapped the plastic wrap and then transferred to another area or into a polybag for sale.

 

Conclusion

Marcotting can be tried because it is simple and the success rate is high.  However, not all fruit crops are suitable using this method.

 

 

Photo Credits: Junizawati Mohd Zin, Agriculture Officer, University Agriculture Park

Date of Input: 20/06/2021 | Updated: 22/06/2021 | syedghazali

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